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Can Australia walk the US-China 'Critical Minerals' extraction tightrope and emerge as a green technology powerhouse?

Australia has tried to walk a tightrope between America, its military ally, and China, its top customer for minerals and ore. This is becoming less and less possible, as USA-China tensions increase.  Marina Yue Zhang, David Gann, and Mark Dodgson, argue for Australia to keep its options open by going beyond minerals exploitation or even competing just for a share of green manufacturing, and to focus on developing "enabling technologies" Panga Media/Shutterstock GLOBALISATION is on shaky ground . As China rises, the United States and its allies are moving to reduce their reliance on the world’s factory. The rivalry between the US and China is wide-ranging, from competition in technology over silicon chips and artificial intelligence to the critical minerals essential for green energy technologies such as grid batteries, wind turbines and electric vehicles. At present, China dominates critical minerals. Beijing has secured supplies of rare earth elements and lithium, which

Indonesia’s uncertain development of its EV-driven nickel value chain

Raw materials, or sacred beings? PRC-backed Lithium extraction in Bolivia puts two worldviews into tension

Clarion call for mining industry: it’s time to act to deliver the critical minerals demanded for energy transition

Scarcely ahead of geopolitics: today's race for critical minerals for batteries

China investment in Australian mining increases despite insecurity concerns